References.

These references include not only the works cited throughout the project but several books, chapters, and articles that I deem relevant to understanding the topics discussed. I wish to express personal gratitude to Terry Ross, co-admin of The Shakespeare Authorship Page with David Kathman, who was of immense help in uploading countless versions of the project; Sean M. Winslow, who helped with the sorting routine of the Facet Search; Anne Dondertman and David Fernandez, who were instrumental in getting the Thomas Fisher Library’s surrogate uploaded promptly to Internet Archive; and Laura Estill, Matthew Steggle, Ryan Whyte, Stephen Wittek, Eleanor Shevlin, and Ann Blair, for offering valuable suggestions and advice at various stages of its creation. I am very grateful to both the Shakespeare Association of American and SHARP: The Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing, for funding my travels to their annual conferences to talk about features of this research.

All e-Resources were accessed last on 12 October 2017.

Astington, John. “Dramatic Extracts in the Interregnum.” The Review of English Studies 54, no. 217 (2003): 601–14. http://www.jstor.org/stable/3661477.
Beaumont, Francis, and John Fletcher. Beggars Bush. In Comedies and Tragedies. London: Humphrey Robinson and Humphrey Moseley, 1647.
—. Comedies and Tragedies. London: Humphrey Robinson and Humphrey Moseley, 1647.
—. The Coxcombe. In Comedies and Tragedies. London: Humphrey Robinson and Humphrey Moseley, 1647.
—. The Queene of Corinth. In Comedies and Tragedies. London: Humphrey Robinson and Humphrey Moseley, 1647.
Bentley, Gerald Eades. “John Cotgrave’s English Treasury of Wit and Language and the Elizabethan Drama.” Studies in Philology 40 (1943): 186–203. https://www.jstor.org/stable/4172613.
Case, Arthur E. A Bibliography of English Poetical Miscellanies 1521–1700. Oxford: Bibliographical Society, 1929. https://archive.org/details/bibliographyofen002547mbp.
Cotgrave, John. The English Treasury of Wit and Language, Collected Out of the Most and Best of Our English Drammatick Poems, Methodically Digested into Common Places for Generall Use. London: Humphrey Moseley, 1655. https://archive.org/details/englishtreasuryo00cotg.
DEEP: Database of Early English Playbooks. Ed. Alan B. Farmer and Zachary Lesser. Created 2007. Updated 2017. http://deep.sas.upenn.edu.
Early English Books Online. Ed. ProQuest. http://eebo.chadwyck.com.
EEBO-TCP: Early English Books Online Text Creation Partnership. Ed. ProQuest. Last accessed 2017. http://www.​textcreationpartnership.org/​tcp-eebo.
Eighteenth-Century Collections Online. Ed. Gale Cengage Learning. http://gdc.gale.com/products/eighteenth-century-collections-online.
Eighteenth-Century Collections Online Text Creation Partnership. http://quod.lib.umich.edu/e/ecco.
Estill, Laura. Dramatic Extracts in Seventeenth-Century English Manuscripts: Watching, Reading, Changing Plays. Newark: University of Delaware Press, 2015.
—. “The Urge to Organize Early Modern Miscellanies: Reading Cotgrave’s The English Treasury of Wit and Language.” Forthcoming in Papers of the Bibliographical Society of America.
Eyre, G. E. B., and G. R. Rivington, ed. A Transcript of the Registers of the Worshipful Company of Stationers from 1640–1708 A.D. 3 vols. London: Privately Printed, 1913–1914. https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/012204105.
Fletcher, John, and William Shakespeare. The Two Noble Kinsmen. London: Iohn Waterson, 1634.
Goffe, Thomas. The Raging Turke, or, Baiazet the Second. London: Richard Meighen, 1631.
Google Books. Ed. Google. http://books.google.ca.
Greville, Fulke. Mustapha. In Certaine Learned and Elegant Workes of the Right Honorable Fulke Lord Brooke. London: Henry Seyle, 1633.
Harbage, Alfred. Annals of English Drama, 975–1700. Rev. S. Schoenbaum. 3rd edn. Rev. Sylvia Stoler Wagonheim. London: Routledge, 1989.
Internet Archive. http://archive.org.
Isherwood, Anne Christine. “Cut out ‘into little stars’”: Shakespeare in Anthologies. Unpublished PhD Diss. King’s College London, 2014. http://​kclpure.kcl.ac.uk/portal/​files/12691146/​Studentthesis-Anne_Isherwood_2014.pdf.
Jonon, Ben. Sejanus His Fall. London: Thomas Thorpe, 1605.
Literature Online. Ed. ProQuest. http://literature.proquest.com.
Mayne, Jasper. The Citye Match. London: Leonard Lichfield, 1639.
May, Thomas. The Old Couple. London: Samuel Speed, 1658.
McEvilla, Joshua. “John Cotgrave’s 1650s Subject Classification and Its Influence on ‘A Dialogue Betwixt Eight Youths.’” ANQ: A Quarterly Journal of Short Articles, Notes, and Reviews 29, no. 4 (Winter, 2016): 200–208. http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/0895769X.2016.1233046.
—. “John Cragge’s The Wits Interpreter.” The Library: Transactions of the Bibliographical Society 18, no. 3 (September, 2017): 337–44. https://academic.oup.com/library/article/18/3/337/4102863/John-Cragge-s-The-Wits-Interpreter.
—. “Shakespeare and Jonson in ‘A Garden of Tulips.’” Notes & Queries 63, no. 3 (Winter, 2016): 559–66. http://nq.oxfordjournals.org/content/63/4/559.full.pdf.
Middleton, Thomas. Hengist King off Kent. Folger Shakespeare Library. Lambarde MS 1478.2.
—. Hengist king of Kent or thee Mayor of Quinborough. University of Nottingham. Portland MS Pw V 20.
—. The Mayor of Quinborough: A Comedy. London: Henry Herringman, 1661.
—. The Mayor of Quinborough: A Tragedy. London: Henry Herringman, 1661.
Munro, John. rev. and enl. The Shakespeare Allusion-Book: A Collection of Allusions to Shakespeare from 1591 to 1700. By C. M. Ingleby and F. J. Furnivall. 2 vols. London: Chatto & Windus, 1909. https://archive.org/details/shakspereallusio02ingluoft.
Oxford Dictionary of National Biography. Ed. H. C. G. Matthew and Brian Harrison. Oxford, 2004. Online edn. Ed. Lawrence Goldman. http://www.oxforddnb.com.
Phillips, Edward. The Mysteries of Love & Eloquence, or The Arts of Wooing and Complementing. London: N[athaniel]. Brooks, 1658.
Records of the Worshipful Company of Stationers, 1554–1920. Ed. Robin Myers. Cambridge: Chadwyck-Healey, 1995.
Suckling, John. The Goblins. London: Humphrey Moseley, 1646.
Wiggins, Martin. “Where to Find Lost Plays.” In Lost Plays in Shakespeare’s England. Ed. David McInnis and Matthew Steggle. Houndsmills, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2014. 255–78.

© Joshua McEvilla, j.mcevilla@utoronto.ca